Arts

‘Extreme Weather’ shows visceral impact of climate change

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In an age of uncertainty, sometimes we have to make our own decisions while neglecting hearsay interlaced with unknowns.

Unfortunately, some controversial issues such as climate change inevitably give way to partisan agendas that aim to obfuscate objectivity.

But Extreme Weather shakes these ensuing political platitudes with an unfeigned approach by invoking the use of powerful and jarring footage that inevitably leaves the viewer nonplussed upon its conclusion.

This special event is playing exclusively at one of the more renowned museums in San Diego at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center in Balboa Park. Extreme Weather is a captivating limited-time engagement about the most destructive forces of nature.

This is where the film shines. It leaves the viewer to make up their own opinions and witness the raw force of nature at work.

A tornado rips through the plains of Oklahoma causing destruction in its path.

A tornado rips through the plains of Oklahoma causing destruction in its path. Photo: Meaghan Calnan, National Geographic.

“All we wanted to do was show the power of what’s happening,” said director and film-maker Sean Casey. “That’s our piece. I am not trying to save the world, I am not going to point a finger at who’s to blame, I am not going to push anybody to do something different. All we’re doing is adding a visual—a powerful image through our medium into the conversation.”

The film follows the paths of two researchers and a team of fire fighters as they attempt to sort out and combat melting glaciers, plangent tornados and engulfing wildfires. While sitting through the resounding noises of the massive separating glaciers or the violent 200 mph winds hitting their Tornado Intercept Vehicles (TIV), the question of the film crew’s intrepidity is the last query that comes to mind.

In fact, these ominously dangerous situations are nothing new for Casey.

“When things get exciting: when you have the tornado bearing down at you, or when you’re cut off and engulfed in a forest fire, or if you have these building-sized pieces of ice coming towards you—these are all moments where you’re paralyzed with the fear of it,” said the former Storm Chasers filmmaker.

“And there is the animalistic urge to run. But then again there is the filmmaker who wants to capture that image; and so even though you want to run, you’re usually at that time when it is something you have to film—because it’s so remarkable.”

One of the many forest fires filmed in Southern California threatens to overtake a fire fighter along with the film crew.

One of the many forest fires filmed in Southern California threatens to overtake a fire fighter along with the film crew. Photo: Meaghan Calnan, National Geographic.

Based in a panoramic IMAX format which amplifies the brevity of the film, the documentary drops the audience on the front lines with over-the-shoulder perspectives of fire fighters combating pervading forest fires that permeate from every direction.

But the film cannot be overlooked as sensational in nature.

Instead, it emphasizes that the recent weather patterns are primarily subjected to chain reactions that in turn exacerbates global temperatures, mounting sea levels, cold as well as warm air fronts and more.

Many of these issues can seem insurmountable to comprehend. However, this is perhaps one of its most showcasing strengths.

For example, Casey methodically shows us how the excess soot from increased forest fires carries to Alaska -at Dawes glacier- and settles on top of the ice. Since the soot absorbs the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays at a much faster rate than exposed ice, the glaciers undergo an accelerated melting rate. With increased ocean levels across the globe, hurricanes drive the surplus water into the mainland causing havoc.

Extreme Weather transports its audience through this process and much more.

The crew rides along with scientist Justin Walker as he attempts plan his next release of a flying probe into a tornado for study purposes.

The crew rides along with scientist Justin Walker as he attempts plan his next release of a flying probe into a tornado for study purposes. Photo: Meaghan Calnan, National Geographic.

It prods the viewer to critically speculate about our planet and the increasing irregularity of weather phenomena across the globe. But the best part is the seamless fluidity of nature that it observes, which in turn captivates the audience through the awesome sights and sounds of the ambiance captured by the daring film crew.

One would be remiss to not attend this masterful artistic rendering of the powerful fluxes elements that inhabit our planet.

And learn a couple of scientific lessons along the way to help better understand the vast intricacies of Earth.

Extreme Weather will be playing exclusively at the Fleet Science Center at Balboa Park from November 11 to November 30 with varying showtimes ranging from noon to 6:00 p.m.

I like to blog about all things about sports, arts and entertainment related topics; while not constraining my horizons to those beats, I like to ramble about breaking occurrences in the video game industry on louisandcaleb3dsreviews.wordpress.com

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