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Why Marvel, why did you sell out to Disney?

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Provided by 'Daniel y go' via Flickr

Provided by 'Daniel y go' via Flickr

It is a dark day in comic book history my friends. In an unprecedented move Marvel has officially been bought out by Disney in a 4 billion dollar deal that has turned the franchise over to the Walt Disney Corporation. The news has hit the presses in a mixture of reactions. What does this mean for the future of Marvel? Will Disney uphold the great legacy that brought us some of the greatest super-heroes and villains?

Disney’s recent acquisition sets fear in the comic book lovers heart and makes us quiver at the thought of anything furry and cuddly invading the world of guns, bombs, superhero beat-downs, and all that is great in Marvel.

The words together present an oxymoron in itself. Much like summer school, and non-alcoholic beer, Marvel and Disney have joined the echelons of ultimate oxymorons. The two companies are so different in ideals and content that one would think they could never co-exist, let alone work together. Four-billion dollars later, the once unthinkable became possible, and the shocking news struck fear into the heart of comic book fans everywhere.

How can Iron Man be Iron Man, when he’s wielding anti-air love missiles, rather than explosive armor piercing tips? How can Hulk smash when his fists are made of gummy bears? Although blown out of context, the message is clear.

Disney isn’t known for its hard-hitting, deeply rooted story lines and intense characters. Instead it is most notably associated to lovable cuddly characters and the happiest place on earth. Who wants happiness in their comics and comic book movies? We want uninhibited violence, sex, drug use, villains that can rival the greatest of dictators, and most of all ass-kicking plots. Disney can’t bring that, they are too inhibited by their corporate binds that will keep this sense of carnage brought by Marvel down with it.

Although recent comic books to movie renderings have been disappointing in totality, they still have a sense of what Marvel is all about. Disney knows nothing of the comic book world other then it is ranking in some serious profits in its recent endeavors.

Mickey Mouse cannot replace Batman, Jafar isn’t a Joker, and Goofy cannot be a Riddler. Disney has no sense of the comic book world. Just because Disney has the capability to purchase the franchise, doesn’t mean they have any sense of what the comic book world is all about. The move will undoubtedly bring a tidal wave of scrutiny and discontent among fans.

Marvel must realize they just essentially sold the soul of their company for economic gain. Disney has always been a powerhouse and proved themselves worthy in the loving, laughable movies. They have not proven an inkling of evidence that they can pull off a powerful, intense comic, or comic book movie.

From this merging of two into one, the comics that we loved, and the movies that were made from them will end as we know it. Not end in a sense of production and availability, but it will lack what made them great. Disney with its corporate conglomeration will take out the trash, and put a more pleasing, viewer friendly Marvel.

The tears should be rolling down your cheeks at this point, the thought of Disney coming in and throwing the proverbial flower into the Marvel pool is sickening. Marvel you broke our hearts, and Disney we continue to hate you for your desecration of the most hallowed of grounds.

If you disappoint the world the upheaval will be one of epic proportion. When making the next Marvel movie, or comic book you better keep in mind that the audience isn’t Twilight fanatics, but violence loving, sex craving, beer drinking, die hard comic fans that will be watching what you put out. So loosen that corporate belt, and take it like a man when you get the spanking of a lifetime for your defilement of Marvel. On the other hand, you could loosen that pseudo “corporate belt” and pump out something great that will make the buyout less of a warning flag, and more of a new age of better comics, and paper to film renderings that we can look forward to.

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