Lifestyle

La Jolla Pupping Season Has Arrived

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Pupping season is here! From February 8th to March 8th, it is estimated that 40-50 new seal pups will be born at Casa Beach in La Jolla. The entire pupping season lasts from December 15th until May 15th, during which time Casa Beach is closed off to the public. Visitors can watch the natural habitat of these seals from the cliffs or the sea wall, and take part of the new pup births from afar.

The seals often don’t give birth in urban settings, but the beach in La Jolla is perfectly conducive for these pups. Several groups, including the Seal Conservancy, the San Diego City Council, and the California Coastal Committee, play a part in the preservation and protection of the seals during this season.

People are encouraged to come and see the birth of these creatures, and experience the joy of welcoming in new life into our world. Use it as an opportunity to bring your children and teach them about the process of birth, in a way they can understand.

Photo Credit: Jon Lee Clark, Flickr-Creative Commons

Pupping season wasn’t guaranteed this year, as a legal case was opened entitled “Friends of Children’s Pool v. City of San Diego.” Children’s Pool, another name for this part of Casa Beach, is known for its friendly wading area that is perfect for kids and families to enjoy. By cutting off access to the beach during the winter months, visitors have to migrate to other beaches for their personal use. The case has gone back and forth, but a temporary lift has been granted to the City to maintain preservation of the pupping season. Read more on the case and the appeals.  

Wanting to take a break from the attractions at SeaWorld? Create a field trip with your kids to explore the natural habitats of marine life. Here’s a brief guide to exploring marine life throughout the beaches of San Diego this winter:

La Jolla – Children’s Pool 

Photo Credit: Jon Lee Clark, Flickr-Creative Commons

Of course we hope that you have gathered from this article the magical gift of experiencing pupping season. Grab some binoculars and head to the seawall of La Jolla’s Children’s Pool and watch the interaction between mom and pop seals with their newborn babies. Come at sunset and experience an incredible view of nature working its magic in the sky as well as in the sea. 

Cardiff State Beach

Head to North County during low-tide to experience the undersea world of tide pools. Bring your water shoes to help keep your feet from getting wrecked by the rocks, and lean down to see starfish, sea cucumbers, and other small creatures. Look up a few different marine-life species before you make the trek so you can know what you’re looking at. There’s a ton of beauty beneath the surface. 

Tour – Whale Watching

Whether you have a boat, or are willing to pay for an excursion, whale watching in San Diego is at its prime from December until April. Look online for the best deals, and see the giant wonders of the sea with your own two eyes. Bring binoculars with you and prepare to be amazed–these animals are unlike any other. 

We hope that you are able to make the trek to see the seal pups this Winter, and enjoy other natural excursions like whale watching and tide pool climbing. Just because it’s winter, doesn’t mean it’s time to stay away from the ocean!

Katrina is an OBcean that spends her time drinking quality coffee and engaging in the community that she lives in.

2 Comments

  1. Delilah Glover-Delage

    March 1, 2017 at 4:14 pm

    It’s the Children’s pool why let it be overun by sea rats? Well they are actually pests and will continue to multiply to the point where there will be nothing to call a beach but a seal poo stinking beach and no fish in the lical area and seals that will turn onto themselves and any local pets the venture near. Then they will spread disease amongst themselves and people and become a health hazard. Avian flu and other pathogens pass easily between them and people. Tome to consider a cull or relocation before this gets girther out of hand.

  2. Delilah Glover-Delage

    March 1, 2017 at 4:17 pm

    Delilah Glover-Delage March 1, 2017 at 4:14 pm
    It’s the Children’s pool why let it be overun by these sea rats? Well they are actually pests and will continue to multiply to the point where there will be nothing to call a beach but a seal poo stinking beach and no fish in the local area and seals that will turn onto themselves and any local pets the venture near. Then they will spread disease amongst themselves and people and become a health hazard. Avian flu and other pathogens pass easily between them and people. Time to consider a cull or relocation before this gets further out of hand.

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